May Long Weekend

The Municipal Office will be closed Monday May 20, 2024 and will re-open Tuesday May 21 2024.  Have a great long weekend!

ONLINE TAX PAYMENTS

The Township of Hudson is now accepting online tax payments with RBC, SCOTIA BANK, CIBC and TD CANADA TRUST.  Residents that bank with these financial institutions are able to setup the Township of Hudson as a payee to make online payments for property taxes.  Current payee names for each corresponding financial intuition are as follows1:

Financial Institution Payee on Website
RBC TOWNSHIP OF HUDSON
TD HUDSON (TOWNSHIP OF) TAX
Scotiabank TOWNSHIP OF HUDSON TAXES
CIBC HUDSON (TOWNSHIP OF) TAX

1 Please confirm with each financial institution as payee names are subject to change.

In addition to the payee name, residents will also require their Roll Number. This 19-digit number can be found in the top right-hand corner on a recent property tax bill or receipt (5421‑######‑#####‑####) and should be entered as per your financial institution’s instructions.

A separate payee must be set up for each roll number, meaning that for residents with multiple tax bills, several “payees” will be required.

If you experience difficulty setting up an online payment, please contact your financial institution for assistance.

User Fee By Law 2023-13

Fire Permits

The Township of Hudson offers fire permits free of charge. Small campfires in fire pit do NOT require a permit. Any uncontained burning requires a permit.  Please fill out the application and return it to the Municipal office (email – admin@hudson.ca or  in person at 903303 Hanbury Road). Please plan ahead to allow sufficient time for the application to be approved.

Fire Permit – Hudson with Burn Plan

Hudson Library News

The Hudson Library will be open Saturdays from 11am until 1pm.

Township of Hudson

The historical period we are dealing with is late, starting in the 1890s. Consequently, the first settlers had experienced urban amenities or the conveniences of mature farming districts in Ontario, the United States, Britain, and other European countries. Their reasons for coming were varied but here they were, cutting bush, turning over virgin soil, or prospecting for minerals. This was the spirit of "New Ontario".

Electricity, although available in towns like New Liskeard, did not reach Hudson farms until the early 1950's. Oil lamps were in common use until then.

The geographical setting of Hudson before this area was even surveyed is interesting because of its position in the Canadian Shield. 12,000 years ago Hudson was under ice and most of it was under the ancient glacial Lake Barlow which formed as the ice melted. As these mountains of ice receded, aboriginal people lived, hunted, and passed through this terrain. Ancient arrow points have been found around Twin Lakes.

Before the land could be 'taken up', it had to be surveyed and channeled through government agencies since it was Crown Land, and in 1897, ten years after the survey was completed, settlers moved in.

According to the census of 1901, the population officially stood at 46, but it should be noted that the Census Day was officially April 1, and did not count several settlers who came later in May or June.

It is a misconception that everyone who came up Lake Temiskaming and trudged out to Hudson came from the same mould. Some survived solely working in the lumber trade. Not everyone was a farmer nor, truth be told, wanted to be one. Some were land speculators including those who were given Veteran's land grants and who held on to their lots until Hudson was developed so they could sell out -- all without lifting an axe. Still others came and found to their horror they simply couldn't deal with the challanges of clearing land or having to do without. These people sold out or simply walked away from their land which, in the final count, left a bunch of hardy souls. Today, there are numerous decendants of the original land settlers who occupy farms or reside on smaller severed lots.

-Excerpts from "I've got to stop here until I'm called for" by Norman Hawirko and Margaret Arnott